Discovering a New Me: My Struggles During Seven Years of Life Abroad キャリアを手放して、新しく見つけたもの 〜私の7年間の海外帯同生活〜

Published on: May 06, 2020

Moving overseas to accompany a spouse can feel like a “career blank” for many professional women, but their experiences of finding a new path always encourage us. Here is another story by Kanako Okubo about how she discovered a new “self” after years of challenges.

 

By Kanako Okubo / Translated by Hanae Matsumura[日本語記事へ]

 

I was brought up in a rural area in Japan where people believed “graduating from a good university and working in a good company led you to a good life.” That was part of my identity, and I was a devoted worker at a company in Tokyo until seven years ago when I got pregnant. 

At the time, my husband was studying at a graduate school in the USA. After many long days of pondering, I decided to move to the US to live as a family. That decision changed my whole life. 

 

Away from my career, I felt bare without a title to introduce myself with. When  asked: “What do you do?” I’d answer “housewife.” I had no income to spend on myself and dress as I wanted. The hardest thing was that I became nervous communicating with people, which I had prided myself on, all because of the language barrier. Living in a students’ dormitory with little opportunity to interact with Japanese people, I suffered from an inferiority complex. 

Even when I went to a children’s playgroup with my daughter, I could not talk with other parents, not even for a short while. I couldn’t sing English nursery rhymes, which everyone else could sing naturally, and I felt like I was a bad mother. I was even afraid of talking with my husband’s friends who came to celebrate the birth of our child and pretended to be sick and stayed in my bedroom.

Then we moved to Nepal. There, too, I couldn’t find Japanese moms with little kids. There were no places to go and let my kid play. I spent many days without talking to anybody except the housemaid. 

 

Every day I was trying hard to survive. Sometimes, updates from my friends in Japan who were building a respectable career got to me, and sometimes I had visitors who were working moms and seemed to live bright lives. My heart was hurting and filled with frustration and anxiety.

Our family moved back to the United States. In New York, my ambition was to get some qualifications for future job opportunities. However, in reality, I had no time to study as I was occupied with my little “kids” (we added another to the family!). 

The moment of change came after moving here to Bangkok. One day I was asked by a Japanese mom at my kids’ international kindergarten: “I’m struggling with my English. How did you learn it?” As I could thoroughly understand her feelings, I talked and talked for an hour or so over a cup of tea, saying, “I was the same as you.”  

After that, several similar opportunities came along. My husband, who knew my toils and efforts more than anyone else, suggested that I support those who are struggling with English. His words encouraged me to take on a new endeavor as a personal coach of English learning for the Japanese. Once the decision was made, my frustration was turned into the burst of energy in preparation. I started a coaching career six months later. Two years have passed since then, now my business is no longer limited to those living in Bangkok, but it extends to those who live in Japan or other Southeast Asian countries.  

I still face uneasy moments regarding languages, but I don’t get nervous by comparing it to others or feel anxious about my future any longer. I once felt like a “bad mother” who cannot even talk with others—this experience made me realize the pleasure of being needed by someone. I now realize that those days were by no means a “blank” as I had thought. I got rid of my old “working in a good company” belief, and now I feel that I am freer than ever.  

I’d like to share a message with those having a hard time away from your home country or if you feel anxious because of the halt in your career. Your present days will certainly lead you somewhere. Nobody can tell where that is. It may be beyond your expectations. But one thing is clear; someday you will realize the value of the difficulty you are facing now.

As for me, I will continue living outside of Japan for a certain period. So I’d like to enjoy child-rearing in foreign countries as much as possible while taking care of myself.  

 

海外帯同期間は、私にとって「ブランク」だと思っていました。でもそれは、新しい自分と出会うための、大切な時間でした。

 

文 大久保香奈子

 

日本の田舎で育ち、「良い大学を出て良い会社に就職するのが良し」という価値観で生きてきた私。7年前に妊娠するまで、都内のオフィスでバリバリ働くキャリアウーマンであることは、私の一つのアイデンティティでした。  

 

当時夫はアメリカの大学院に留学中だったのですが、夫の一時帰国中に妊娠。私は悩みに悩んで、日本で仕事を続けるのではなく、家族で一緒に暮らすことを選択しました。

そこから全てが変わりました。

 

名刺に書けるような職名はなくなり、「何してるの?」と聞かれると、「主婦してるよ」と答える。また、夫も私も収入がないため自由に使えるお金もなく、ネイルもお洒落もゼロ。何より辛かったのは、得意分野だった人とのコミュニケーションですら、言語の壁により緊張してしまうこと。学生寮に住んでいたこともあり、日本人との付き合いはほぼなく、全てが英語で、コンプレックスの塊でした。  

 

育児の気晴らしにと、生後まもない娘を連れてプレイグループに行けば、周りの親ともまともに話せず、周りが当たり前に歌う子どもの歌も歌えず、まるで自分がダメ母かのように感じる。出産祝いに来てくれた夫の友人達と話すのが怖くて、体調不良のふりをして寝室に引き籠っていたことも。次に引越したネパールでも、小さい子連れの日本人ママは一人もおらず、遊び場もなく、気づけばメイドさんとしか会話をしていないという日も多々ありました。  

 

毎日が勉強で、毎日が必死でした。そんな時に、友達が仕事で活躍していることを聞いたり、来客者がキラキラ輝くワーママだったりすると、私の心はチクリと痛み、焦りや不安に苛まれるのでした。次に引越したニューヨークでは、資格を取るなどして将来のキャリアに繋げようという意気込みはあったものの、当時は小さい子ども達の育児に精一杯で、結局何もできませんでした。  

 

変化が訪れたのは、ここバンコクに来てからです。ある日、子どもが通うインター幼稚園で日本人のお友達から「英語ができなくて困っているんだけど、どうやって英語を勉強したの?」と聞かれたことがありました。私はその気持ちが痛いほどわかり、一時間程お茶をしながら必死でお話ししました。私も同じだったよ、という一言も添えて。   

  

その後も同じような出来事が何度かありました。「英語で苦労している人をサポートしてみたら?誰よりもその気持ちがわかるんじゃない?」私の苦労を誰よりも近くで見ていた夫からの一言をきっかけに、思いきって日本人を対象に個人のレベルと目的に合わせた学習方法を提案・サポートしていく英語学習のパーソナルコーチとして活動することを決意しました。決意してからは、それまでのモヤモヤを爆発させたかのように準備を進め、半年後にはコーチとしてスタート。2年経った今では、バンコクだけでなく日本や東南アジア在住の方々をサポートさせていただく機会も増えました。 

 

今でも言語には苦労していますが、他の人と比べて焦ったり、将来の不安に苛まれるということはなくなりました。人との会話すら出来ないダメ母だと感じた時期があったからこそ、誰かの役に立つということがこんなに嬉しいことなんだと改めて思えます。自分にとって「ブランク」だと思っていたあの時間は、決して「ブランク」ではなかった。従来の価値観も崩れ、今、身も心も自由に生きていると感じています。   

  

もし今、自国を離れて辛いと感じる方や、キャリアが止まって不安を感じる方がいらっしゃったら、今の日々がいつか必ず、何かに繋がるときが来ます。何に繋がるかはわかりません。想像もしないことかもしれません。でもいつかきっと、「あの経験をして良かった」と思える日が来るはず。私はまだ当分海外転勤生活が続きそうですが、自分も大切にしながら、海外での育児を楽しみたいと思っています。

 

About the Author

Kanako is a personal coach of English learning who provides both online and face-to-face sessions. She is mom to three kids (6, 4 and 1 years old) and has lived in Boston, Nepal, New York and Bangkok over the past 7 years.

Blog (Japanese): https://ameblo.jp/terrys-cafe/

 

6歳、4歳、1歳児のママ。この7年間、ボストン→ネパール→ニューヨーク→バンコクに暮らす。日本人を対象にオンライン・対面での英語コーチングを行なっている。日本語ブログはこちら。https://ameblo.jp/terrys-cafe/


The views expressed in the articles in this magazine are not necessarily those of BAMBI committee members and we assume no responsibility for them or their effects.

BAMBI News welcomes volunteer contributors to our magazine. Please contact editor@bambiweb.org.

 

Tags: