Happy Caregiving for Elderly Parents 明るい「介護のビジョン」を描くには

Published on: June 23, 2019

When you visit your parents after a long interval, have you ever felt like they’ve suddenly aged? Although it’s difficult when you are living abroad, you can still prepare for the time when they will require caregiving.

By Machiko Mori / Translated by Fumi Yasui [日本語記事へ]

You might not have much chance to think about your parents in your busy daily lives, but the time will surely come when we will have to face the issue of caregiving for our parents.

Many of us come from Japan, a super-aging society, where 60% of elderly people over the age of 85 need nursing care. You yourself may need to care for your parents in, who knows, 20 years, 10 years, even 5 years.

Caregiving also includes gathering information … and learning about your parent’s health condition. 

So when should we start preparing for caregiving for our parents? The answer is: when you start feeling anxious about their aging.

The word ‘caregiving’ may conjure up images of providing physical support to the elderly. But that’s not all. Caregiving also includes gathering information about the available care services where your parents live and learning about your parent’s health condition.

Caregiving requires more than just loving your parents. And it won’t happen by itself. It’s also not about worrying and becoming anxious about the unknown.

Caregiving will require a concrete strategy based on a vision of the future. It starts with envisioning the kind of caregiving set-up your parents and you, the children, want.

So where to start? How do you figure out what your parents and you want? Especially when you live far away from your parents? 

Caregiving requires more than just loving your parents. And it won’t happen by itself.

The first step is to strengthen your relationship with your parents. How often do you communicate with them? How much do you know about them?

Long before your parents need to be cared for, there are six points you should confirm with them:

  1. Where do they want to live?
  2. By whom do they want to be cared for?
  3. By whom do they NOT want to be cared for?
  4. Who pays for the care? Where will the funds come from?
  5. Any requests for terminal care?
  6. Any wishes regarding their funeral?

It’s hard to ask all of these questions out of the blue. Even if you do, it may be difficult for them to tell you what they really think without time to consider first. Start off by communicating more with your parents and building a strong(er) relationship. Then envision what you and your parents expect, based on your communications with them and an informed, concrete understanding of the situation surrounding them. Once that vision is clear, it will become easier to work out a strategy for the future.

Start from these small steps, so that both you and your parents can spend each moment happily and comfortably as they approach this phase of their lives. 

 

親も子どもも笑顔になれる 明るい「介護のビジョン」を描くには

久しぶりの帰省で、親の老いを感じることはありませんか?大事だけれどつい後回しにしてしまう「親のコト」を考えてみましょう。

By 森真智子

日々、育児と家事で忙しくしている私たちが、「親のコト」について考える時間はないかもしれません。でも、親の介護はいつか必ずやってきます。

情報を集めることも「介護」のひとつです。

超高齢社会を迎えた日本では、85歳以上の高齢者の60%が介護を必要としています。親の介護が必要になる時、それは、私たちにとって20年後、10年後、もしかしたら5年後かもしれません。では、親の介護の準備はいつからするべきでしょうか。それは親の老いが気になった時です。

「介護」というと、親のそばで、身体的なお手伝いをすることを思い描くかもしれませんが、親が住む地域の介護サービスを調べたり、親の健康状態を気にかけたりするなど、情報を集めることも「介護」のひとつです。

また、「介護」は気持ちだけでは絶対に上手くいきません。成り行き任せでも上手くいきません。どうなるか分からない先のことを、あれこれ考えて不安視するのではなく、将来をイメージして戦略を立てることが大切です。戦略を立てるためには、親本人や子どもである私たちがどういうことを望むのか、「介護のビジョン」を描かなくてはいけません。

「介護のビジョン」を描くこと、そのために、親と遠く離れて暮らしている私たちが、今からでもできることがあります。それは親との関係づくりです。

「介護」は気持ちだけでは絶対に上手くいきません。

みなさんは親とどのくらいコミュニケーションをとっていますか?親のことをどのくらい知っていますか?

親の介護が始まる前に、親に聞いておいた方がいいことが6つあります。

①親が住みたいと思っている場所はどこか?

②親は誰の介護を受けたいと思っているか?

③親は誰の介護は受けたくないと思っているか?

④介護資金はどこから?誰から?

⑤いざという時の治療希望は?

⑥葬儀に関する要望は?

これらのことを全て、突然聞くことは難しいです。聞いたとしても、親も心の準備ができず本音を話してくれないかもしれません。まずは親とコミュニケーションを増やし、しっかりした信頼関係を築くことが大切です。

親とコミュニケーションをとり、親の現状をしっかり把握したうえで、親や私たちがどうしたいかというビジョンを持ちましょう。ビジョンが見えれば、それを実現するためにどうすればいいか、戦略を立てることができます。 

親の人生の最終局面、親も私たちも「いま」を少しでも快適に笑顔で過ごせるように、できることから始めてみましょう。

 

Photo by Matthew Bennett on Unsplash.

About the Author

Machiko is a licensed care worker and care manager who worked at a nursing home for 8 years in Japan. She came to Bangkok 1.5 years ago following her husband’s job transfer. She is engaged in supporting children with developmental disabilities at a graduate school. Blog (Japanese): ameblo.jp/machijirou0920/

介護士として日本の有料老人ホームで約8年間勤めた後、夫のバンコク転勤により退職。バンコク在住歴1年半。大学院では発達障がいのある子どもたちの支援に携わる。介護福祉士、ケアマネジャーの資格を持つ。ブログ⇒https://ameblo.jp/machijirou0920/


The views expressed in the articles in this magazine are not necessarily those of BAMBI committee members and we assume no responsibility for them or their effects.

BAMBI News welcomes volunteer contributors to our magazine. Please contact editor@bambiweb.org.

 

Tags: