When Traditional Culture Leads to New Opportunities

Published on: February 15, 2021

 

Noriko Tsuboi has taught and performed the Japanese instrument Koto in the United States and Thailand. Here are her stories and hopes.

By Noriko Tsuboi / Translated by Hanae Matsumura

Looking back, I have spent almost half of my life away from my home country, Japan. Back when I was in Japan, my mother motivated me to learn Koto, one of the traditional Japanese musical instruments. This paved the way for my life in the U.S. and Thailand. I am grateful that my musical life has given me lots of precious encounters and opportunities.

After a childhood in Fukuoka, I moved to Tokyo to learn and perform Koto with my teacher. Then I moved to the U.S. to teach Koto at a university in California. The Koto class had a variety of students—Americans rooted in Europe, Africa and Asia, together with students from other countries including Japan—and they had different interests and motivations toward Koto. In the class, instead of traditional pieces which are difficult and require a lot of time and effort to learn, I chose some modern pieces which incorporate Western rhythm and phrases into the characteristic scales and techniques of Koto. That helped the number of students grow gradually. I also organized a Koto ensemble with students who took my class for one or two years to hold concerts and lectures and demonstrations at nearby universities, hospitals and art galleries. I suppose most of the students were simply attracted by Koto itself, but while teaching, I couldn’t help hoping that their experience of knowing a foreign culture through music would somehow lead to international exchanges in the future.

Later, I moved to Thailand. This country has a strong relationship with Japan and I feel that people expect Koto to serve as an introduction of Japanese culture rather than pure music. This gave me opportunities to “show” Japan on various occasions including Thai-Japan cultural exchange events, a performance in front of Thai Royal family members, and coaching Koto to Thai actors who were going to play the roles of Japanese in a television drama, etc. I feel more motivated each time and it makes me straighten myself up.

Even within Japan, the environment and lifestyle change greatly with the times. It is undeniable that the long-cherished traditional cultures have also been affected by the diversification of sensibilities and values among generations with the influence of Western culture after World War Two. I believe in the necessity of trying to create something that is unique to a time by inhaling something new of that time in order to nurture our traditional cultures, not only maintaining old good things in their conventional style. Plus, “traditional music living in the present” is more easily accepted by a wider audience. I hope that by living abroad I can utilize my experience of interacting with people from various countries through music or daily life to attract more people to the world of traditional music and spread the universal appeal of Koto.

In addition to getting foreigners interested in Japanese musical instruments, it is my greatest pleasure that the Japanese living in foreign countries rediscover the values and attractions of Japanese cultures. As children today are going to act and live more globally, I believe that learning the traditional cultures of their own countries by themselves as part of education is so worthwhile that it can also contribute to forming their identity and understanding different cultures. I sincerely hope that my students will someday feel that their experience of learning Koto enriched their lives, just like I do.

 

ふと自分の人生を振り返ってみて、ほぼ半分に相当する期間を海外で過ごしていることに気づきました。母の影響で箏(琴)を弾きはじめ、それが後にアメリカ、そしてタイでの生活へと繋がっています。音楽に携わる生活が、かけがえのない出逢いや貴重な経験を与えてくれていることに感謝しながら今の日々を過ごしています。

 

実家のある福岡から上京し師匠の元で修行と演奏活動を行なった後、私はカリフォルニアの大学で箏を教えるために渡米しました。ヨーロッパ系、アフリカ系、アジア系のアメリカ人や、日本を含む外国からの留学生など、授業を受けにくる学生達はまさに多種多様で、箏に興味を持った理由もそれぞれです。本人が希望する場合を除き、難解で習得に時間を要する古典曲ではなく、西洋のリズムやフレーズを取り入れ箏独特の音階やテクニックと融合させた現代曲で授業を行なったところ、箏クラスを選択する学生は次第に増えていきました。一年、二年と継続する学生達と箏アンサンブルを結成して、近隣の大学や病院、アートギャラリーなどでコンサートやレクチャーデモンストレーションなども開催しました。ほとんどの学生は純粋に箏という楽器の魅力に惹きつけられたのだと思いますが、彼らが音楽を通して異国の文化に触れる機会を得た経験が、将来何らかの形で国際交流に繋がればとの期待を抱きながら教えていました。

 

その後、縁あって生活の拠点をタイへ移すことになります。日本との関わりが強いこの国では、音楽というより文化紹介としての要素を箏に求められると感じることが多く、日タイ文化交流イベントの他にもタイ王室メンバーの御前演奏や、テレビドラマで日本人を演じるタイ人俳優への演奏指導など様々な場所で「日本」を披露する機会があり、その都度身が引き締まる想いです。

 

同じ日本という国に生まれても、時代によって環境や生活様式は全く異なります。特に戦後、西洋文化の影響を受けて育った世代の感性や価値観の多様化は、長年継承されている伝統文化においても多少の影響をもたらしていることは否めません。しかし、良いものをできるだけ元の形で受け継ぐことと並行して、新しい風を吹き込みその時代にしかできないものを作り出す試みもまた、伝統を紡いで行く過程で必要なことだと思っています。そしてその「今を生きる伝統音楽」のほうが一般的に受け入れられやすいのも事実です。海外に住む私が、音楽活動や生活の中でいろんな国の人と共有してきた体験を糧にしながら伝統音楽の間口を広げ、箏の普遍的な魅力をよりわかりやすい方法で伝えていくことができれば本望です。

 

外国人が日本の楽器に興味を示してくれることと同時に、海外に暮らす日本人が日本文化の魅力と価値を再認識してくれることも、私にとって大きな喜びです。特に、これから益々活動の場を世界へと広げていく子ども達が、自国の伝統文化について見聞きするだけでなく、実際に学び、教養として身につけていくことは、アイデンティティ形成や異文化理解の上でも大いに役立つ意義のあることだと信じています。いつか生徒たちが「箏に触れたことで人生がより豊かになった」と、私と同じように感じてくれることを願ってやみません。

About the Author

Noriko is a player and teacher of Koto who belongs to Sawai Koto Institute. After graduating from the NHK Academy for Japanese Traditional Music, she taught Koto at the Faculty of Music of the University of California San Diego from 1992 to 1997. She moved to Bangkok in 2001 and continues performing around the world while teaching young players.

生田流沢井箏曲院所属。NHK邦楽技能者育成会修了。1992〜97年、カリフォルニア大学サンディエゴ校音楽学部にて箏クラスを指導。2001年よりバンコク在住。後進の指導にあたりながら、世界各地で演奏活動を行なっている。


The views expressed in the articles in this magazine are not necessarily those of BAMBI committee members and we assume no responsibility for them or their effects.

BAMBI News welcomes volunteer contributors to our magazine. Please contact editor@bambiweb.org.

 

Tags: